Event Information

18+ w/ valid photo ID, under 18 must be accompanied by parent or guardian. Reserved seating is available for $180 (SOLD OUT) and guarantees a seat in the reserved section. If necessary groups will be pair together at tables. Seating is based on time of purchase and the configuration of groups.  

Thievery Corporation (Live) - SOLD OUT Biography

Spend a day with Thievery Corporation’s Eric Hilton and Rob Garza and you might hear them make reference to David Cope, the university professor who studies music and artificial intelligence, or mention Garza’s travels to Sudan and Nepal, or explain why The Clash’s London Calling may just be the best-produced album in rock history. So it’s not surprising that Hilton and Garza’s thoughtful curiosity about the world finds its way into their sophisticated, impeccably crafted musical soundscapes that reflect not only their broad appreciation for diverse styles of music (everything from Brazilian bossa nova and Jamaican dub reggae to vintage film soundtracks and psychedelic space rock), but also their take on the complicated times in which we live.

Since banding together 16 years ago, these two independent thinkers have taken a DIY approach to their musical and cultural interests, which has led to the formation of their own record label, ESL Music, through which Thievery Corporation release recordings by a slew of international artists, such as Federico Aubele, Ursula 1000, and Thunderball, as well as their own recordings. The label is run out of the basement of a Gothic-style three-level townhouse in Washington, D.C., that is also home to Thievery Corporation’s recording studio, which is filled with the latest high-tech gear as well as vintage guitars and Moog keyboards. The studio is where the two songwriters and producers have crafted their own output: six studio albums, three compilations, and numerous EP’s and singles — an impressive body of diverse work that has made Thievery Corporation one of the most influential and respected names on the electronic/dance music scene.

in June, the duo will release its sixth studio album, Culture of Fear — a cinematic-sounding inquiry into space rock that straddles the sweet spot between funk and soul, with a bit of dub and reggae thrown in for good measure. The title track, featuring vocals/lyrics by rapper Mr. Lif, comments on the fact that, nearly 10 years after 9/11, “everyone is afraid of everything,” Hilton says. “People are living like wimps. The terror level is always at orange. Now we’ve got body scanners in airports. Somehow the whole country’s been spun into this pointless web of fear.” Adds Garza: “People have learned to be subservient to the system, automatically taking their shoes off at airports. Our message with this album is that there really is nothing to fear. The things we’re being told to fear aren’t what we should fear. The intrusion into your day-to-day rights and privacy are a whole lot scarier.”

Culture of Fear continues to address the socially conscious themes that Thievery Corporation have explored since 2002 when they released their third studio album, The Richest Man in Babylon, which incorporated protest music into their sound. They followed Babylon with 2005’s The Cosmic Game, which featured politically minded collaborations with Perry Farrell, Flaming Lips frontman Wayne Coyne, and David Byrne. In 2008, the duo paid homage to people’s resistance movements around the world with Radio Retaliation — setting a think-for-yourself agenda to eclectic sounds from Jamaica, Latin America, Asia, and The Middle East. The album, which questioned the profit-driven mentality of corporate media, earned Thievery Corporation a Grammy Award nomination for Best Recording Packaging. (An image of Mexican revolutionary Subcomandante Marcos appears on its printed cardboard sleeve cover.)

“We’re probably more radical in our political beliefs than most of the hardcore punk bands,” Hilton says, “but at the same time, we’re realistic about what we can actually do. We feel like our role is to be commentators.” Adds Garza: “The best thing we can do is try to open people’s minds.” For both Hilton and Garza, the seeds for their shared philosophy were sown while growing up near the nation’s capitol, which has spawned an abundance of progressive punk bands over the years, such as Bad Brains, Minor Threat, and Fugazi. “We’re influenced by that mentality, but the music doesn’t need to be about super aggressive guitars or hard-charging beats to convey that feeling,” Hilton says. “Sometimes you can just break things down and be more subtle.” Instead, the duo reveal their globally aware mindset by setting their lyrical diatribes to a lush mélange of international grooves, inviting vocalists and musicians from around the world, including Nigerian Afrobeat heir Femi Kuti, Persian singer Lou Lou, and Jamaican reggae toaster Sleepy Wonder, to appear on their recordings. As the L.A. Weekly put it: “Thievery Corporation’s dance hall is a delectably subversive refuge for dissent, a multilingual broadside against complacency and the powers that be.”
Thievery Corporation was hatched in 1995 when Hilton and Garza were introduced by a mutual friend at Washington, D.C.’s Eighteenth Street Lounge — a popular gathering place for musicians and nightlife seekers that is co-owned by Hilton. Hilton had been producing parties and various music events before opening the Lounge with a fellow DJ in the top three floors of a turn-of-the-century mansion just below Dupont Circle. He also had a recording studio, where Garza had once done some music production work, but the two had never met until the night Garza walked into the Lounge.

“I was really impressed by what Eric had built,” Garza says. “The music they were playing and the whole mood of the place was very inspiring.” The two discovered that they shared The Clash and D.C. punk label Dischord as a formative musical influence, that they both loved ’60s and ’70s Brazilian music, “and that we were both interested in talking about stuff that other people aren’t interested in talking about,” as Hilton puts it. They decided to try to make some original music together.

In 1996, Thievery Corporation launched itself with two underground hit vinyl singles, “Shaolin Satellite” and “2001 Spliff Odyssey,” followed by their debut album, Sounds from the Thievery Hi-Fi, and soon became loosely associated with the “trip-hop” scene that had emerged a few years prior in the U.K. In 2000, they released Mirror Conspiracy, which introduced live vocalists, including Bebel Gilberto and the late Pam Bricker into the mix. (Bricker sings on Thievery Corporation’s breakthrough hit “Lebanese Blonde,” which was included on the Grammy Award-winning soundtrack to the 2004 film Garden State.) Following The Richest Man in Babylon and The Cosmic Game, the duo released 2006’s Versions, featuring their remixes of songs by such artists as Sarah McLachlan, Astrud Gilberto, Anoushka Shankar, and The Doors. By then, Garza and Hilton were itching to evolve past their reputation as ambassadors of the “downtempo” scene, and began to conjure up more subversive recordings that reflected their interests in social activism, as can be heard on Radio Retaliation and, now, Culture of Fear.

Over the years, Thievery Corporation has also become known for the carnival-esque atmosphere of their live shows, during which they bring out a 15-member live band of musicians and vocalists. The group has sold out shows at such famed venues as the Hollywood Bowl, London’s 02 Shepherds Bush Empire, and the Theatro Vrahon Melina Merkouri in Athens, Greece, among many others. “To see Lou Lou, a Persian singer singing in Farsi, as America debates on a war with Iran, on stage with band members from all corners of the earth singing in Spanish, Portuguese, French, and so on, it makes people wonder,” Garza says. “And if you can get people to question the things around them, even just a little bit, that’s not such a bad thing.”

Mr. Anonymous Biography

2012 kicks off with a brand new release by Mr. Anonymous entitled “Champion Sound”. Jeep Macnichol a.k.a. Mr. Anonymous a.k.a. “original drummer from the ’80′s/’90′s pop jam band The Samples” teams up with Ranking Roger from The English Beat to deliver a fresh organic sound using only live drums, bass, and guitars and even live horns. The sound behind the album is a mix of reggae, dub, soca, and jazz, and as the founder Jeep MacNichol states, “my approach going into the album was to create a vibe like a mix of The Clash’s Black Market Clash and Miles Davis’s Kind Of Blue. I wanted a raw analog punk production where the singers sound like they’re sitting in the room with you.”

Over the past 2 years, Mr. Anonymous released a Live E.P., 6 singles, 5 music videos and has attained over 10,000 downloads. He has played for thousands of fans across the state of Colorado headlining and sharing the stage with acts like Thievery Corporation, Kool Keith, Anthony B, Pretty Lights as well as a reunion show with his old band The Samples for 30,000 screaming fans at Mile High Music fest. Macnichol started his music career as founding member and drummer of the Colorado based pop/jam band The Samples. For a decade, his musical journey included 6 national album releases, national touring for 9 months a year in every venue imaginable in every state, sharing the stage with Sting, Dave Mathews, Steel Pulse, Flaming Lips, The Wailers, Sonic Youth, Blues traveler, the Horde tour, and a performance on the Jay Leno show. After 10 years, Macnichol decided it was time to follow new creative endeavors and dive into his love of Jamaican dancehall and reggae music.

In the fall of 2003, warning signals were coming from Kingston Jamaica…warnings of a musical, dancehall movement calling for new experimentation. Macnichol saw this as an opportunity not to be passed and thus the birth of his new musical persona, “Mr. Anonymous”. Under his new alias, he was ready to embark on a mission like no other!!! Armed with an Acoustic Guitar, “Echo Box”, and Megaphone, base was quickly set up at Kingston’s famed Liguanea Club where, Ian Flemming’s classic James Bond adventure ”Dr. No” was filmed. Contact was made with several key informants including Sly& Robbie, Bounty killer, Cutty Ranks, and Barrington Levy, as well as several underground agents including Brando and Dr. Innocent. After making contact, studios were secured and the mission commenced… The meeting of ”Guitar Driven Psychedelia” with “Dancehall Machine Gun Fire” was born!!!

The parameters for the mission were as follows… All instruments including live drums, bass, moog, electric and acoustic guitars, synthesizers, percussion, and megaphone were to be performed by Mr. Anonymous….Informant vocal performances all Ad Lib… No rehearsing or prewriting of lyrics… The essence of each session was to capture freeform raw energy and spontanaeity… most all performances were delivered freestyle…. thus the “Blueprint” for the Mr. Anonymous phenomenon and the debut album simply entitled “Mr. Anonymous”.

Four years later, after a brief imprisonment with an enemy organization(counterintelligence record label), Mr. Anonymous returned with “Mr. Anonymous 2″. For this mission, boundaries were pushed to “the extreme” into the “Dub” world and new contacts were made with key liasons in London England as well as Kingston Jamaica. Agents including Ranking Roger and Dave Wakeling of The English Beat organization as well as Pinchers and Mega Banton(both in Kingston) and an agent from the West Coast of Africa were a handful of informers deployed. The parameters for all the performances were again works of Raw Energy and Pure Improv. Like the title of a song, from Senegal to Jupiter (by way of Kingston and London), the sound is a meeting of Dancehall Machine-Gunfire, Dub, Electro, Robotic, and Guitar Psychedelia.